Petchey Academy - Power to the People Project #5: Creating Thermochromic Ink Interactive Art

 

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This was a collaborative project between four organization. Petchey Academy, Space Studios, Arts Catalyst and Codasign in London, UK

The project was developed as part of The Power of the People initiative by Space Studios. Codasign was brought in to provide the technology support over six weeks with the students. The students were enrolled in the school's product design class. We introduced Arduino and thermochromic ink to the students. We also designed and produced the printed circuit boards (PCB) with the students.

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The students conceived of creating a modular image where they each took ownership of a square. When all the squares were assembled a single image was formed. One of the students drew a skyline of London. Each student was assigned a square to draw their interoperation of their section. All the images were outline with black ink. The color was applied with the thermochromatic ink. The students also conceived and designed their own button for the their square of the image.

The student programmed Arduino with a RGB LED. The programed the color for their LED when the button was pressed.

The final project was a gridded image. Each square of the image of connected to a button. When the button was pressed a LED lit up on the button and the color thermochromatic ink was heated up and became transparent. The result is the only the black outline are left.

The final project was unveiled at The Power of People #5 exhibition at the The White Building on April 2, 2014.

flickr: petchey academy images


Hippokampos in the Grey Matter

hippo_feetinwater wave+vf

Hippokampos in the Grey Matter explores how we relate memories to a physical place and how these are shared with others, yet are never quite the same. The game takes people through a network of memories – places and trails from our past, and traces them into the physical landscape of Athens, exploring how memories can cross in the same way paths can.

This game experience is inspired by psychogeography practice and research in the temporal memory. Psychogeography approaches our landscape through our human emotional and behavioral responses, instead strictly measurements of distance and features. With Hippocampus, we took someone’s memory of a favorite walk. (Temporal) and worked with them to extract the salients elements of the experience. Then used those elements to reimagine the walk in completely different space.

 

The game was commissioned by AthensPlaython for their inaugural September 2012. We ran a workshop where the participants developed the narrative clues within the framework of myth. The participant designed game was run in the final day of the festival.


 

The game was developed in collaboration with Mztek, a learning community in technology and arts for women.


Bottled V.2

The plastic bottle is a symbol of controversy It the first worlds it a status symbol of health and wealth paying 1,000 times more than for tap. In third worlds it is a one of the leading causes of pollution. In 2002, approximately 31% of soda bottles were recycled, while only 11% of water bottles are due to lack of deposit required on water bottles. This is shocking when you consider that bottled water is the second most popular beverage to soda.

I created the first iteration of the sculpture to reference the Hudson river waves.

flickr: Bottled V.1

For Bottled V.2, I had the wonderful  the opportunity to collaborate with Jersey City Museum and the students of Jersey City Schools. We worked together to collect over 2000 bottles to create the bottled V.2 installation. The students decided to create a skyline similar to the downtown district.

flickr: Bottled V.2: Installation

flickr: Bottled V.2: Opening

The sculpture was on display at the Jersey City Museum Satellite Sculpture Center at Mack-Cali building on Christopher Columbus Drive in downtown Jersey City. Bottled V.2 ran from January - August 2010.

 

 

 


lapPAC

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lapPAC facilitates independence and privacy for students using motorized wheelchairs. Typically students who use motorized wheelchairs carry all their possessions in backpacks that hang on the back of their chairs. The students do not have the ability to reach around behind their chairs to access the backpacks. This lapPAC is designed for students with Duchennes Muscular Dystrophy(DMD). Students with DMD have limited reach and macro-movements while they retain dexterity and micro-movements. The lapPAC provides DMD students with the ability to access a laptop, a voice recorder and a water bottle.

The form and aesthetics of the lapPAC is proof of concept that assistive technology devices don't have to be clinical to be functional. This tray is currently being used by a student at a public school in New York City. The student calls it his "docking station".


 

Development Blog: All Fixed

Roles: Designer and Fabricator | 2006

Collaborator: Karen Roston, Occupational Therapist

Consultants: The students who use motorized wheelchairs and the occupational therapists at P.S. 199 in New York City.

Professors: Marianne Petit, Anita Perr and Michael Schneider
Developed in Introduction to Assistive Technology at Interactive Telecommunications Program at New York University.


Remember Me

Photos by: Rotem Tashach

Remember is an exploration of personal community. In this case the community is comprised of the mobile devices we carry with us everyday. The layers of technology that we tote around with us daily create a digital second skin. The jacket is a physical representation of this second skin and is wired to display the communication between our digital devices.

In this project we empower the objects to converse with each other through the use of Bluetooth. The conversation serves two purposes. The first goal is for the objects to stay in touch with each other. If one of the objects goes missing, leaves the conversation, the jacket will visually displays the disruption. The second goal is for the conversation to create a shield of digital noise that will prevent any attempt to access personal data.

Finally, the devices and the Jacket are equipped with physical switches. The LEDs on the jacket displays whether all the devices are connected or not. This function creates a physical security of the items.

Featured Venues

CuteCircuit Show: video by Megan MacMurray


Roles: Co-Designer and Co-Developer | 2006

Collaborators: Sonali Sridhar and Angela Pablo

Professor: Raffi Krikorian
Developed in Every Bit You Make at Interactive Telecommunications Program at New York University.