Mobo Fashion

 

mono led bracelet  mono scarf

Mobo Fashion Pod ran as part of Quest2Learn’s after school program.  Quest2Learn (Q2L) is a New York City Public School that is focused on the translation of the underlying form of games into a powerful pedagogical model for its 6-12th graders.

 

As Q2L’s after school program, Mobo Studio is an enrichment space designed to activate kids' curiosity about creativity, design, and mobile technologies. Mobo Studio utilizes a project-based, studio-like learning environment to inspire kids to explore new topics and hone new skills. With a focus on digital citizenship, design expertise and community engagement, Mobo Studio extends Q2L's focus on tinkering, problem-solving, designing, and inventing.

 

mono qrc mobo fashion

Mobile Fashion Pod

I designed a mobile fashion curriculum for launch of Mobo Studio. I ran the Mobile Fashion Pod during the fall of 2009. The atmosphere of the pod was to create a professional environment. To reinforce the professional environment the following were put in place:

  • The students were referred to as “Fashion Professionals” (FP) by mentors and each other
  • At the first session, the FP drafted a code of conduct that was a series of guidelines that everyone signed.
  • Each session consulted the mentor and agreed on agenda that was written on the white board.
  • Each FP was assigned a task to ready the space for work: arranging tables, setting up sewing machines.
  • As new terms were introduced the FPs were encourage to use them as appropriate in conversation.
  • When conflict arose the FP came together as a group to devise a way to resolve the issue(s).

The Goals:

  • Participants be comfortable with technology: sewing machine, smartphones, building soft circuits
  • Learn industry terms regarding fashion and fashion industry
  • Concept, design, produce and user test products
  • Learn importance of collaboration and communication in the creative process

The Products:

  • Txt Scarf – A scarf with a pocket to store a phone or ipod so that the wearer could access the phone undetected. An added bonus is that it also served as a way to carry the phone when the user was wearing a dress without pockets.
  • Sema (QR) Code  Purse – A purse designed with an opening on one side to allow the camera lens of a phone to be accessible. This allowed user to take convert pictures or decipher sema-code posted in the environment. High tech passing notes.
  • LED bracelet – A felt bracelet that has three leds on it. The participants learn about how to control electricity in a circuit by prototyping on a breadboard. Then they build a soft circuit for the bracelet.

Resources:


Roles: Mentor and Curriculum Designer | 2009


Grab-a-Crab

01

Grab-a-Crab is a game that assesses the user's skills and abilities for completing tasks in an inventory job. The game uses the metaphor of sorting sea creatures which map to the high level skill set needed to successfully perform inventory tasks. The data of user’s game actions are captured for analysis. This game is the first in a series of assessment gaming experiences for evaluating the digital literacy of people with cognitive disabilities. View Mapping Diagram.

Gaming Experiences for Evaluating Digital Literacy (GEEDL)

People with cognitive disabilities currently have limited job placement opportunities because of antiquated job placement methodologies and assumptions of limitations by potential employers. The goal of this project is to develop gaming experiences that will open new opportunities of employment in our expanding technology driven society of a population that is often overlooked by employers.

To date we have conducted two rounds of field testing on the Stage 1 initial pilot online game, Grab-a-Crab, in May, 2009: December, 2009.  Multiple sets of developmentally delayed/autistic students and adults participated in the field-testing, conducted at a school for students with developmental delays and at an adult day program. Although there was a broad range of levels of the student and adult beta testers, students exhibited a consistently high degree of engagement, motivation and interest by the participants.


 

Client: Bridgemultimedia

Roles: Project Manager and Game Designer | 2009 - 2010

Collaborators: Matt Kaplowitz and Dharmarajan Ayakkad

Organizational Support: Interactive Telecommunications Program (ITP) at New York University, and the Chimes Foundation, Baltimore, MD,